A cure for ageing?

General discussions about future technology and the human race.

When do you think ageing will be cured?

Within the next 5-10 years
0
No votes
Within the next 11-20 years
2
5%
Within the next 21-50 years
14
35%
Within the next 51-100 years
16
40%
Within the next 101-200 years
5
13%
A few centuries from now
0
No votes
Thousands of years from now
0
No votes
Probably never.
3
8%
 
Total votes : 40

Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby wjfox2009 on Thu Sep 09, 2010 8:16 pm

Some fairly major news here... :)





Sierra Sciences co-authors paper announcing successful lengthening of telomeres to extend human lifespan

Sept. 8, 2010, 5:56 p.m. EDT

Sierra Sciences, in collaboration with TA Sciences, Geron Corporation, PhysioAge, and the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), has announced the first compound ever discovered that activates the enzyme telomerase in the human body - a critical prerequisite for technology that could arrest or reverse the aging process in humans. This compound is a natural product derived nutraceutical known as TA-65. These findings appear as a research article entitled 'A natural product telomerase activator as part of a health maintenance program,' published September 7, 2010 ahead of print in the peer-reviewed journal Rejuvenation Research. The article can be found at .

Researchers discovered that TA-65 was associated with a statistically significant "age-reversal" effect in the immune system, in that it led to declines in the percentage of senescent cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells after six to twelve months of use. In addition, further analysis with automated high-throughput confocal microscopy (HT-qFISH) revealed a decline in the percentage of white blood cells with critically short telomeres after twelve to eighteen months of use.

Several peer-reviewed publications have calculated that humans have a theoretical maximum lifespan of 125 years, but our health declines long before that. Many scientists believe that this limit on lifespan and decline in health is imposed by the gradual shortening of our telomeres, structures at the ends of our chromosomes that shorten with every cell division. Telomere shortening is thought to be the "clock of aging" contained within the human body. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that a human cell that does not undergo telomere shortening will divide indefinitely and is, by all available measurements, immortal.

The publication reports that TA-65 can cause telomerase, an enzyme that lengthens telomeres, to become active in human cells. Telomerase activation by TA-65 was shown to lengthen the shortest telomeres in humans, potentially extending human lifespan and healthspan. Telomerase activation is thought to be a keystone of future regenerative medicine and a necessary condition for clinical immortality.

Although TA-65 is probably too weak to completely arrest the aging process, it is the first telomerase activator recognized as safe for human use.

"We are on the cusp of curing aging," said William Andrews, Ph.D., co-author of this study and President and CEO of Sierra Sciences, LLC. "TA-65 is going to go down in history as the first supplement you can take that doesn't merely extend your life a few years by improving your health, but actually affects the underlying mechanisms of aging. Better telomerase inducers will be developed in the coming years, but TA-65 is the first of a whole new family of telomerase-activating therapies that could eventually keep us young and healthy forever."

Telomerase activation has potential medical applications beyond extending human lifespan. Epidemiological studies have shown that short telomeres in humans are a risk factor for diseases including, among others, atherosclerosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's, and cancer.

The present study also reports encouraging news on the effect of TA-65 on the body's immune system. Infectious diseases lead to telomere shortening in the immune system, as immune cells divide to fight infections. Telomerase activation should prevent this telomere shortening and allow the body's immune system to fight a chronic infection indefinitely.

The present study on TA-65 lends support to this hypothesis. In individuals infected with CMV, a virus which prematurely ages the immune system and significantly reduces life expectancy, TA-65 caused an apparent "age reversal" of approximately 5 to 20 years based on one biomarker of immune aging.

For the same reason, telomerase activation is a potential treatment for AIDS. "We tend to see HIV turning into AIDS when the cells of the immune system develop critically short telomeres," said Andrews. "HIV can essentially cause the immune system to die of old age while the majority of the body is still young. A telomerase activator could theoretically prevent an HIV-positive individual from ever developing AIDS."


8-) :D
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby Saradus on Sat Sep 11, 2010 5:51 pm

Fantastic news! Hopefully the first step in a long line of developments soon to come! :D
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby Andrew Shevchuk on Sat Sep 11, 2010 8:40 pm

Ironically, this is exactly the opposite of what the SENS Foundation suggests for a permanent cure to aging. Their argument is that the enzyme telomerase is essentially what allows cancer to exist (because it allows cells to replicate indefinitely, bypassing the Hayflick limit). Instead they suggest completely removing the telomerase gene from our DNA and replenishing our bodies with our own stem cells (whose telomeres are lengthened in the lab before infusion) once every decade or so. These cells can then only replicate a finite number of times, but as long as they are periodically replaced we can maintain a healthy state indefinitely with effectively zero risk of cancer. I worry that the approach in this article is going to make cancer rates explode if it enters clinical use.
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby MissTomorrow on Mon Sep 13, 2010 7:25 am

Andrew Shevchuk wrote:Instead they suggest completely removing the telomerase gene from our DNA and replenishing our bodies with our own stem cells (whose telomeres are lengthened in the lab before infusion) once every decade or so. These cells can then only replicate a finite number of times,.


Wouldnt that mean you'd die in 10 years if you couldnt get the treatment again? No thanks. Thats like Dorian Grey's picture -keeps him young but if the magic was broken, he grows old & dies in a instant.

The Aids cure would be a good bonus. Certainly the teleomerase tech sounds exciting, I'd volunteer to test it!

Problem is, don't our brains lose cells every year? Even if that wer stopped, a immortal would run out of brain storage for new memories. Eventualy you'd need an artificail brain..
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby Andrew Shevchuk on Wed Sep 15, 2010 2:42 am

MissTomorrow wrote:
Andrew Shevchuk wrote:Instead they suggest completely removing the telomerase gene from our DNA and replenishing our bodies with our own stem cells (whose telomeres are lengthened in the lab before infusion) once every decade or so. These cells can then only replicate a finite number of times,.


Wouldnt that mean you'd die in 10 years if you couldnt get the treatment again? No thanks. Thats like Dorian Grey's picture -keeps him young but if the magic was broken, he grows old & dies in a instant.


It would, but I suspect that when treatments reach this level they'll become cheap and ubiquitous, just like DNA sequencing should be in a couple years. It is generally in our best interest as a society to disseminate anti-aging therapies as widely as possible. Most of the supposed downsides to doing so are hypothetical (things like overpopulation, immortal dictators, lack of meaning to life, etc.). What's real is that we waste trillions of dollars and countless resources on age-related health issues every year, and yet we still have roughly 100,000 age-related deaths per day. It's all rather futile until we have real technological solutions. This telomerase drug, though not a panacea, is a step in the right direction.
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby MissTomorrow on Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:27 am

Andrew Shevchuk wrote: Most of the supposed downsides to doing so are hypothetical (things like overpopulation, immortal dictators, lack of meaning to life, etc.).


Over population would be the biggest objuection to making people immortal or much longer lived. Though I supose immortal people would not want to spend etenity having & raising more & more kids, so they might get themselves sterilised. Or that might even be a required price for the immortality treatmnt.
Immortal dictators- probably any regime lead by a dictator wil carry on after his death any way, like in North Korea where the dictatorship passed from father to son. All dictatorships are brought down eventualy either by revolt or foriegn invasion, so it wouldnt realy matter if its still the original leader or a replacemnt when he is overthrown.
Lack o fmeaning- I dont see why, most people think life is too short & having unlimited time to enjoy it would make everything so much more worth while. Of course people wouldnt chose to live forever if they didnt enjoy life & hsaw no hope of improvement. And any one who just got bored could always stop with the treatments.

What's real is that we waste trillions of dollars and countless resources on age-related health issues every year, and yet we still have roughly 100,000 age-related deaths per day.


Good point :D
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby Italian Ufo on Sat Oct 09, 2010 5:28 pm



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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby wjfox2009 on Thu Apr 14, 2011 8:17 pm

Fountain of youth: Scientists divided on pill to reverse aging

The aging process can be reduced by increasing telomere lengths, according to research published Tuesday in Aging Cell, a peer-reviewed journal.

Scientist Maria Blasco, a molecular biologist at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, tested TA-65, the natural telomere growth supplement, to show that aging could be reversed without cancer risk, something that earlier research claimed about increasing telomere length.

Full story:
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby Prolite on Fri Apr 15, 2011 6:58 am

You didn't read the whole article:

"But the changes didn't last," Singer continues, "and overall longevity didn't change. Nor did average telomere length of the treated mice — a measure that countless previous studies have deemed the more important measure."
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Re: A cure for ageing?

Postby classical piano guy on Fri Apr 15, 2011 9:09 pm

Telomerase research is still in its infancy, so I really wouldn't advise investing in any pills at the moment. Moreover, after reading the last paragraph of that article, I might even call that product a borderline scam.

Even so, the studies currently under way in that field are still looking more and more promising each month. And with stem cell research and nanomedicine also accelerating at unprecedented rates, there is no longer any doubt in my mind that, barring global catastrophe, anti-aging treatments/medications will be available to the general public within the next 40-50 years.
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