Probes to Gliese 581 g

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Does Gliese 581 g have life on it?

No, I think that Gliese 581 g does not have life on it
2
22%
Yes, I think that Gliese 581 g has small, simple microbes on it
6
67%
Yes, I think that Gliese 581 g has advanced multicellular life on it
1
11%
Yes, I think that Gliese 581 g has intelligent life forms on it with intelligence at the same level or above Homo Sapiens'
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 9

Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby TreeHandThing on Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:05 am

One of the things on the timeline that I would love to see would be a section on probes to Gliese 581 g. This planet was recently discovered ( In September 2010 ), and is right in the middle of it's star's habitable zone. Does this planet have life on it? Maybe :D
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby Italian Ufo on Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:17 pm

We can just suppose things in this case. It might exhist some sort of bacteria on the planet or primordial forms of life, but i am skeptical about finind ET.
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby TreeHandThing on Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:34 pm

I don't really believe there is life on Gliese 581 g ( mainly because abiogenesis is such a rare process ), but it is a monumental astronomical discovery. It may even have water oceans on it.
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby truthiness on Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:02 pm

TreeHandThing wrote:I don't really believe there is life on Gliese 581 g ( mainly because abiogenesis is such a rare process ), but it is a monumental astronomical discovery. It may even have water oceans on it.


How can you be certain that abiogenesis is so rare? On Earth, it only took at the most one billion years to happen randomly (in all likelihood, it happened earlier and we simply haven't found the fossils yet, in which case it only took perhaps 500 million years or so to happen randomly). It may simply be a matter of getting the right chemicals in the right place for a long enough period of time that the random interactions can achieve a sustainable cycle of replication. Gliese 581 is already at least 2 billion years older than our sun (and it'll be around for about 100 times longer than the sun), so if this world does host liquid water and the necessary soup of amino acids, hydrocarbons, and so forth that occur fairly commonly in nature and in space, I'd be surprised if there wasn't life there. Abiogenesis may have occurred on Earth more than once. Perhaps at some point after what we consider the origin of life on Earth, proto-lifeforms sprang forth from a soup of chemicals only to be dispatched by the already established organisms. Perhaps some of these also-rans have become some of the things we call viruses or prions. It may be happening right now near some hydrothermal vent or boiling volcanic hot spring or deep underground. Or, it may have happened only once in the entire history of the galaxy, or the universe for that matter. With only one known example and with the chances of a second discovery happening anytime soon so slim (on Earth, anyway), its pretty hard to tell exactly how rare it is. Another example of impossible to gauge rare-ness would be the leap from single-celled organisms into organized multi-cellularity. It took far longer for this to occur than did abiogenesis - on Earth, anyway. Another example is the leap to intelligence, which is almost certainly an evolutionary accident and not an inevitability among worlds with multi-cellular life. But its very hard to say for sure with only one example just how rare or common it is.
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby TreeHandThing on Wed Feb 09, 2011 1:29 am

truthiness wrote:Gliese 581 is already at least 2 billion years older than our sun (and it'll be around for about 100 times longer than the sun), so if this world does host liquid water and the necessary soup of amino acids, hydrocarbons, and so forth that occur fairly commonly in nature and in space, I'd be surprised if there wasn't life there.


Good point. It'll be around for 100 billion years, and it would be a miracle for abiogenesis NOT to happen.

Abiogenesis may have occurred on Earth more than once. Perhaps at some point after what we consider the origin of life on Earth, proto-lifeforms sprang forth from a soup of chemicals only to be dispatched by the already established organisms. Perhaps some of these also-rans have become some of the things we call viruses or prions.


That is a cool theory. Non-cellular life such as viruses have always confused me.

Until we produce abiogenesis in the laboratory, I think that it's impossible for us to know for sure what the chances are of it occuring.
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby Craven on Wed Feb 23, 2011 1:38 pm

TreeHandThing wrote:Good point. It'll be around for 100 billion years, and it would be a miracle for abiogenesis NOT to happen.


Not exactly. I guess there are dozens of reasons why liquid water may not be enough. After all we could have three life supporting planets around. But Venus and Mars went bad. I've read somewhere that while red dwarfs are very stable, flares there can get very violent. Add closer distance from planet to star, and you can get pretty serious problems.
But I'm sure once life appears there it could survive there - but plate tectonics or some other way to support minerals can be required though, not to mention magnetic field (but well maybe that too isn't required).


PS. Hello everyone, it's my first post here. I love TimeLine :).
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby wjfox2009 on Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:37 pm

Craven wrote:
PS. Hello everyone, it's my first post here. I love TimeLine :).


Hi there, and welcome to the forum. 8-)
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby Time_Traveller on Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:29 pm

I think that there will be small microbes on the planet and welcome to Timeline Craven
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby TreeHandThing on Fri Feb 25, 2011 1:17 am

Time_Traveller wrote:I think that there will be small microbes on the asteroid


Gliese 581 g is a planet bigger than Earth, not an asteroid.
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Re: Probes to Gliese 581 g

Postby ExplorerAtHeart on Fri Feb 25, 2011 2:57 am

I would love to see what the local environment would be on a large tidally locked world(to its sun). I imagine desert on one side with and icy night side with posible water or not in the transition. The transition is probably fairly stormy.
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